Tag: Johnny Wilson

What can we say except, that we have been waiting for something like this for a long time. Christmas isn’t far of but still, this is an early gift. So thank you, Johnny.

Starring:

Nik Stain, Cyrus Bennett, Max Palmer, & Andrew Wilson.

THE CHAMP IS HERE! and you know Oski couldn’t let his product just sit in the shelves without hitting us over the head with a little Malmö special.

Johnny’s first skate clip in a while and it is a good one!

The description Johnny now John Wilson gave on his Vimeo says it all this is an old clip he probably made right after this Nike SB trip to Argentina. Now it is a video for us all to watch. Enjoy!

Genesis Evans as himself in “Genny’s Day Out“. You will find a lot of familiar faces in this one.

https://vimeo.com/201011171

A short one by an injured filmer named Johnny Wilson you might know his work.

This video was filmed before he broke his collarbone and it has some good moves, some mediocre moves, and one stand out trick. Namely a boardslide around a very tight corner done by Donovon Piscopo, simply great!

Some good footage in this new QS drop off it’s got some of our favorites people like Daniel Kim, Dustin Henry, Zered Basset, Josh Wilson, Kevin Tierney, Louie Lopez, Johnny Wilson (skating) and a very underrated Keith Denley. Enjoy!

Since the introduction and explosion of social media, every skater has turned into his or her own marketing machine with a great outlet for creativity.

Obviously, some are better than other some even turn into filmers, editors or designers later on in life. We feel this video By Cyrus shows promise, it has some noticeably strong minutes (especially in the beginning). But with anything in life don’t take our word make up your own mind.

Featuring: Cyrus Bennett, Aidan Mackey, Vincent Touzery, Logan Lara, Johnny Wilson, Max Palmer, Jesse Alba, Hjalte Halberg, Chris Milic, Paul Grund, Genesis Evans and more.

After Donald Trump’s election, last year Alex Olson told me.

“People think Punk music is coming back.”

I had to stop and think about it, the general attitude has become more punk in recent times. But I didn’t really see an increase in the Punk music I did, however, start to notice another musical current rising up (pun intended). Caribbean music, especially Reggae has made its way into the video side of contemporary skateboard culture.

Punk, Reggae and skateboarding the links between these forms of expression are not that outlandish, despite a strong difference in style they are closer than you might think.

Let’s start with connecting Punk and Reggae, this snippet supplies a short explanation into their worlds.

Now that we established that there is some common ground between the two scenes.  The next step is to find a connection to our own sub-culture.

For those of you that are aware of skateboarding’s history, you know that skateboarding started as a DYI (Do It Yourself) culture. The DIY attitude was firmly embedded into us from the moment a pair of roller skate axles were screwed onto some wood and it continues to live on in every one of us who chooses to customize his or her board or fix a spot.

Even though we did a lot of research it is hard to pinpoint the moment when Reggae entered skateboarding. We did, however, find an early example of a part set to skateboarding.

Jef Hartsel one off the first part set to Reggae music (World Industries, Rubbish Heap, 1989).

Since it is hard to pinpoint the exact moment, we can only guess. We do know that places like New York, have had a strong Caribbean community since the early 1900’s so it could be that it happened when skateboarding got known in these communities cultures collided and merged. Black skateboarders historically talked about a backlash withing their own community who considered skateboarding a white activity. But as skateboarding started to become popularized and it had its first peak the diversification process had already started and parts like the one bellow where the result.

Keith “Huf” Hufnagel’s part in Penal Code is an early example of how to combine skateboarding and reggae music (1996).

Then things seemed to take a backburner for a while and truth be told, my generation did not grow up watching these parts. To us, Reggae was this cliché thing about weed and dreadlocks. It felt like a very small thing in our skateboard world, There were some moments I.E: when Tosh Townend skated to Lee Scratch Perry or John Cardiel who skated to Sizzla but to be honest it felt more like a one-off thing to us.

An entire brand dedicated to the genre (Satori, Roots and Culture, 2004).

The now legendary I-Path promo (2005).

In the mid-2000’s things seemed to be more divided, not only the image of the brand but the image of the skater became increasingly important. It was the start of what we see today, you can be a super good skater, but are you relatable, inspiring and do kids want to skate, dress and be like you?

Some brands were basing or at the very least connecting their image to Caribbean culture. In doing that they spoke to a new audience and created a platform for Reggae style skaters I.E. Matt Rodriguez.

Niell Brown in “The 103 Video.” (2010)

At the end of the 2000’s things started to change back to Penal Code times, there were multiple videos that for lack of a better term casually used Reggae music in people’s parts.

One of the videos that had a big influence on me was “The 103 Video” A video with fluent editing and an even better song selection, it changed my opinion on Reggae/Dub/Dancehall. It wasn’t that I couldn’t hear the quality or that I was incapable of liking the music but the video combined the music in such a way that I started to see the diversity instead of the genre’s clichés.

https://vimeo.com/113099306
A recent resurgence of Caribbean flows (Johnny Wilson, Paych, 2014).

Today use of Caribbean music has become commonplace in both skateboarding and pop culture as a whole, Supreme used it in their videos and collections and pop star Drake works with Caribbean artists, talks about Caribbean “Tings” on tracks with a Caribbean style rhythm.

2017 will show if this will continue as a mainstream movement or if it will return to the fringes, either way, we suggest you spend some time doing your googles, reading up and engulfing yourself in the world of Caribbean culture.

Leave it up to Bill Strobeck to further influence the youth (Supreme, Pussy Gangster, 2016).

Text by Roland Hoogwater
Images by Supreme

11 minutes of phone footage of your favorite New York skaters. Watch Max Palmer, Chris Milic, Ben Kadow, Andrew Wilson, Nik Stain, Jesse Alba, Logan Lara and many more in this Sideyard Production.

We can only speculate what CT stand for. It could stand for multiple things, things like Chet Thomas, Cool Time or Choi Time (because John Choi has the last two tricks in this) but we choose to believe it stands for Cut because the standout this to us is the great sudden cuts that Johnny Wilson makes in the edit. Obviously, the skating is great too.

https://vimeo.com/192971592

We posted the two Quartersnacks Copenhagen offcuts now here is the final result. Filmed by the prolific Johnny Wilson with skating by Ishod Wair, Alex Olson, Bobby Worrest, Hjalte Hallberg, Oski, Andrew Wilson, Cyrus Bennett, Ville Wester, Hugo Boserup, Max Palmer and Ryan Bobier.

Photo by Zach Malfa-Kowalski

After the first clip earlier this week, it’s time for the second nordic offcut montage. It seems like everybody is having so much fun out there.

 

Featuring: Alex Olson, Ishod Wair, Zach Malfa Kowalski, Andrew Wilson, Bobby Worrest and some of their other friends.

The Quartersnacks guys are out in Europe every summer and slowly but surely CPH seems to have become their favorite spot to chill overseas. Also for the hip hop heads out there you might enjoy the Capone-N-Noreaga reference in the title of this thing.

Featuring Max Palmer, Hjalte Hallberg, Karsten Kleppan, Louie Lopez and some other Johnny Wilson affiliates.

“Skate New York With the City’s Coolest Crew for Vogue”

Is the official title of this video and it is enough to divide people into different camps. The skating is obviously great and the music isn’t bad at all maybe it is the name Vogue that bothers people, we don’t know!
To us, the real shock is that more and more girls seem to openly show love for nerdy activities! I don’t know about you guys but when we were growing up playing Pokemon, kicking a hackeysack around or even skateboarding did not exactly seem to be that cool to the girls we were hanging out with. In recent times the script has been flipped and the beauty in that is what Alex Olson probably wants us to see.

We haven’t seen a Johnny Wilson video in some time and that is slightly unusual for the most productive crew in NY, sure Johnny has been in Paris working on Supreme stuff but in the end that is Bill’s thing. So it is good to see Johnny and company back on our computers screens with the 21st installment of his HD series. Enjoy!

https://vimeo.com/173256374

Quartersnacks has been putting out clips like crazy lately, this one shot by Johnny Wilson of “Horny” and Paych fame. The clip features: Cyrus Bennett, John Gardner, Dom Travis, Ty Lyons, Rob Sissi, Tyler Tufty but more importantly this clip might initiate the return of the extremely oversized big white tee know to many as a as Ghetto Gown.